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Career Planning

Finding Work Months After College Graduation

It is a fact that college graduates are finding it difficult to launch their careers. Despite officially lower unemployment numbers, record numbers of Americans are not in the workforce. Moreover, job growth is weak with the best growth occurring in the service sector.

Academics

Should You Transfer to a Different College?

Ideally, students will start and finish their undergraduate work at the same school, enjoying the familiarity, consistency, and the security of attending one school. There is something to be said about student and faculty relationships that are built over four years, what can provide a lifetime of mutually satisfying support.

NCAA Football

College Football Crowns a New National Champion

Tweet Florida State Seminoles Are Champs The Florida State Seminoles are the champions of major college football, winning in stunning fashion on Monday. Its 34 to 31 victory over the

Scholarships

Get Ready for Your College Scholarship Interview

With the cost of higher education as high as it is, students should apply for college scholarships to help defray their expenses. Billions of dollars in college scholarship money is offered every year with awards ranging from one-time gifts of a few hundred dollars to full-ride scholarships at top-notch universities.

Scholarships

College Scholarships: January 2014 Edition

Reducing the cost of higher education begins with you, the student. Filling out a FAFSA form and applying for grant money are important steps in helping to reduce your college costs. Applying for college scholarships can also help your cause, reducing your expenditures further.

Study Tips

New Study Habits for the New Year

Are you satisfied with your academic progress? Specifically, are your grades where you want them to be? Let’s face it: students with a high grade point average (GPA) stand a better chance of landing a job or receiving grad school acceptance than those with average scores.

Finance

Will This be the Year You Return to College?

When older adults return to college, they’re often labeled as “non-traditional students.” That means these individuals do not fit into the usual 18-24-year-old age category that describes the traditional college student, although not necessarily the “average” college student these days.