College Football – Division 2 and You

College Football – Division 2 and You

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When someone thinks of college football they think of giant men, tailgating, competition, passion, hard hits, fun. While all of that may be included in what college football is all about, many people do not witness the other side of what goes into putting on a show for the crowd. How much time is truly committed to being a college football player, but most importantly, how much does someone give up to remain a college football player?

Its especially hard if you have a family that you must look after, because a scholarship only gives an individual so much, especially at a division 2 university. Division 2 rarely gives full scholarships, and if they do it’s to the athletes they couldn’t get with less money, so they had to pay them the most.

Unfortunately, most division 2 football players aren’t the guys who get the most money. Yes it does pay for your school expenses, and depending what school you’re attending that can be a lot of money, but what about what happens to you outside of football? What if your child needs diapers and you have no money left from your scholarship to pay for them? What about your families food, who is going to pay for that?

What most people don’t realize is how much football resembles a full time job except you are also on call 24/7 when you leave your work place and you do not get money to provide to your family. If a coach calls you and says you have to be somewhere at a certain time, wear a certain outfit, or act a certain way, you must do it or you put yourself at risk of losing your scholarship and/or being suspended.

This means as a college football player you do not have time to work and provide your family with money to do anything, let alone yourself. Before this year, college football players were going to bed hungry because they didn’t get enough food from their provided scholarship.

That is one thing to deal with by itself, but what if there is a child involved? If you do not have enough money to provide for yourself then it is going to be hard to provide for your child without taking out a substantial amount of loans. Which the whole point of getting an athletic scholarship is so you don’t have to take out any loans and walk away from a university, you most likely would not have attended otherwise, debt free.

Having a family and playing college football without an amazing support system is next to impossible because you are not able to do anything for your family alone. Most college football players look to their relatives in times of need so that they can provide for their kid(s). Things such as clothes, diapers, daycare (very expensive), food for family and the list can go on.

Something else that is very commonly overlooked is what it does to your significant other and how it affects the health of your relationship. Keep in mind that as a college football player you are hardly ever home because you’re in class most of the day and then in the evenings it’s practice. By the time you get home it’s 8 pm and you have homework, not only that but you are exhausted. Then you have to work up the energy to be a father while trying to spend quality time with your spouse, which will most likely consist of you falling asleep and her wondering why she ever agreed to be out here with you.

With all that said, with all the negative there is always a positive flip side and that is that you get to play the game you have grown to know and love. You get to go out every Saturday and put on a show for all of the people that came to watch your team destroy the opponent. It may not be the easiest job in the world, but I would say, if you don’t have a family to support, it is definitely worth the commitment.

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Categories: NCAA Football